Face Coverings, Including Burqa, Are Banned on Sri Lanka After Easter Sunday Bombings

"President Maithripala Sirisena took this decision to further support the ongoing security and help the armed forces to easily identify the identity of any wanted perpetrators," the press release stated.
Just a week after the Easter Sunday blasts shook Sri Lanka, killing more than 250 people and injuring at least 500, President Maithripala Sirisena has now called for a ban on burqas. He took the decision to ban face coverings, including veils, to prevent terrorists from covering up their identity after the Easter bombings, reports CNN.
Face Coverings, Including Burqa, Are Banned on Sri Lanka After Easter Sunday Bombings

"President Maithripala Sirisena took this decision to further support the ongoing security and help the armed forces to easily identify the identity of any wanted perpetrators," according to a press release from the president's office. “Wearing garments that cover the face completely will be banned from tomorrow, to ensure public safety, “ it added.
The emergency law passed by Sri Lanka's president goes into effect, starting Monday as the nation is still on high alert a week after the bomb attacks. The intelligence agencies have warned the civilians that more violence could be imminent.
Face Coverings, Including Burqa, Are Banned on Sri Lanka After Easter Sunday Bombings

The move to ban the garment worn by some Muslim women came into effect after a Sri Lankan parliamentarian proposed the idea over security reasons. Ashu Marasinghe submitted a motion to parliament stating that the garment should be outlawed on security grounds and that it was “not a traditional Muslim attire”. He added that terrorists may use face coverings to escape authorities by concealing their identities.
Face Coverings, Including Burqa, Are Banned on Sri Lanka After Easter Sunday Bombings

However, the law does not prevent women from wearing hijab, which leaves the face exposed but covers the hair and neck. Following the tragic Easter bombings, the Sri Lankan security officials have also issued a warning stating that more attacks may be imminent. What is even more shocking is that authorities fear the Islamist militants behind the Easter Sunday bombings may this time, use a van and be disguised in military uniforms, reports Reuters.
Face Coverings, Including Burqa, Are Banned on Sri Lanka After Easter Sunday Bombings

"There could be another wave of attacks," the head of ministerial security division (MSD), a unit of the police, said in a letter to lawmakers. "The relevant information further notes that persons dressed in military uniforms and using a van could be involved in the attacks," the letter said.
Face Coverings, Including Burqa, Are Banned on Sri Lanka After Easter Sunday Bombings

A string of powerful blasts had ripped through three churches and a couple of five-star luxury hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday. The attacks took place in three five-star hotels in Colombo: the Cinnamon Grand, the Shangri La and the Kingsbury. At least 38 foreigners died in the attacks.

“This is a time our hearts are tested by the great destruction that took place last Sunday,” Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith, the archbishop of Colombo, told during a mass. “This is a time when questions such as does God truly love us, does he have compassion towards us, can arise in human hearts.”
Face Coverings, Including Burqa, Are Banned on Sri Lanka After Easter Sunday Bombings

Although security officials believe it was the National Tawheed Jamath, a local extremist group, that is behind the terrorist attack, ISIS has claimed responsibility. However, a connection between the terrorists and the terror group has not been proven so far. The police authorities have arrested over forty suspects in connection with the multiple attacks.
Face Coverings, Including Burqa, Are Banned on Sri Lanka After Easter Sunday Bombings

As Sri Lanka implements the burqa ban, it becomes one among many nations in Asia, Africa, and Europe that have done so in order to prevent terrorists from using the garment to conceal their identities.

The nations that have enacted a ban on the garment include Chad, Cameroon, Gabon, Morocco, Austria, Bulgaria, Denmark, France, Belgium, and Xinjiang, a Muslim-majority province in northwestern China, the paper reported.