Health Workers Are Upset Because More And More Babies Are Born Addicted To Opiates

The opioid epidemic has become a global problem. Experts at The National Institute of Drug Abuse explain that babies struggle with opioid withdrawal symptoms every fifteen minutes. Addicts’ babies are hospitalized in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The ICU organizes volunteers to work as “baby cud...
The opioid epidemic has become a global problem. Experts at The National Institute of Drug Abuse explain that babies struggle with opioid withdrawal symptoms every fifteen minutes.

Addicts’ babies are hospitalized in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The ICU organizes volunteers to work as “baby cuddlers.”
Health Workers Are Upset Because More And More Babies Are Born Addicted To Opiates
Baby cuddlers give babies love and rock them to sleep. This has become a part-time job project in Iowa, Virginia, San Antonio and Massachusetts.

Most babies with neonatal abstinence symptoms are born in the University Hospital in Bexar Country, San Antonio. The hospital staff asked for more baby cuddlers.

Doug Walters is an army veteran who was among the first to help the hospital. He’s been a baby cuddler for several years. Tiny babies deal with seizures, tremors, increased reflexes, body stiffness and tight muscles. They even have GI problems and breathing difficulties.

The poor babies sometimes let out an identifiable cry, and it’s really sad because babies can’t understand why everything hurts.

Nurse Laurie Weaver worked in the NICU for 27 years. She explains that three to four hundred babies are born with this syndrome in the Bexar County. Hospitals need more volunteers as babies need to be fed every three hours, and volunteers don’t have enough time to hold them.
Health Workers Are Upset Because More And More Babies Are Born Addicted To Opiates

Dr. Meredith Flores says that babies with this syndrome do better when held and cuddled. Vicki Agnitsch is a former nurse, and she says that touch is important for these babies. It reduces their need for medication.

There’s also a cuddling program in Warrenton, Va.’s Fauquier Hospital. Volunteers are needed to rock infants, and the first signs of improvement are noticed within a few weeks.