Doctors Unlock a Secret, Explaining The Way Hiking Changes Our Brains

Hiking has much more benefits than you can imagine, and it’s great for your body and mind. Believe it or not, hiking can change your brain, and even science approves it. Physical inactivity triggers numerous health problems. Research explain that being physically active is really important as it h...
Hiking has much more benefits than you can imagine, and it’s great for your body and mind. Believe it or not, hiking can change your brain, and even science approves it.
Doctors Unlock a Secret, Explaining The Way Hiking Changes Our Brains

Physical inactivity triggers numerous health problems. Research explain that being physically active is really important as it helps you prevent numerous diseases and even premature death.
Hiking is one of the best ways to improve overall health and lower your risk of developing health problems.

Here are some of the benefits you will experience when going in the woods once in a while:

Lower stress, better mood and improved mental well-being
Low risk of heart disease
Low blood pressure
Low cholesterol levels
Weight management
Low body fat
Improved bone density
Osteoarthritis treatment
Better flexibility and coordination
Better life quality
Strong relationships with friends and family

Hiking is a good cardio, and it will:

Improve your balance
Strengthen glutes quadriceps, hamstrings and other muscles
Strengthen core
Healthy weight

Spend more time in nature to improve your mood and neutralize negative energy. This is of great help for those dealing with anxiety.
Doctors Unlock a Secret, Explaining The Way Hiking Changes Our Brains

Experts of the National Academy of Sciences released a study according to which hiking reduces negative thoughts and energy. They found that those who walk for 90 minutes in nature have lower levels of rumination and reduced neural activity in the subgenual prefrontal cortex. It’s the part of your brain that’s related to mental disease.

Psychologists Ruth Ann Atchley and David L. Strayer conducted a similar study in which they found that people can improve their creative problem solving by disconnecting from technology and spending time in nature.

Technology and urban noise affect cognitive thinking and demand your attention, switching your focus from important things.

Hiking improves ADHD in children, helping them cope with impulse control issues, distractions, and excessive hyperactivity. A study conducted by Frances E Kup, Ph.D., and Andrea Faber Taylor, Ph.D., found that green outdoor activities relieves the symptoms.

Hiking helps you burn 400-700 calories per hour. A group of researchers at the University of British Columbia found that aerobic exercise increases the hippocampal volume in women over 70, improving their memory loss, lowering stress and anxiety.

This part of the brain is related to spatial and episodic memory. Hiking also improves their self-esteem and stimulates the production of endorphins.

Start at a low pace, and increase the intensity gradually. Get yourself some nice hiking shoes, always wear a hat and buy some light clothing. Don’t forget your water bottle!

Trekking poles will help you regulate your speed and relieve the pressure in your knees. Download apps and find accurate maps.