Man Stole $122 Million from Facebook and Google By Simply Asking Them for Money

Evaldas Rimasauska, 50, a man from Lithuania, plead guilty to stealing a combined $122 million from Facebook and Google between 2013 and 2015. His charges were US wire fraud, aggravated identity theft and three counts of money laundering. In March, he admitted to the charges and agreed to forfeit...
Evaldas Rimasauska, 50, a man from Lithuania, plead guilty to stealing a combined $122 million from Facebook and Google between 2013 and 2015. His charges were US wire fraud, aggravated identity theft and three counts of money laundering.
Man Stole $122 Million from Facebook and Google By Simply Asking Them for Money

In March, he admitted to the charges and agreed to forfeit almost $50 million to the United States.
How did he do it?

He pulled off this heist by sending invoices to the major companies for items that they did not order. Amazingly, both of the companies filled the requests.

He sent invoices along with forged paper work, such as falsely signed letters and contracts, in order to make his request look legitimate. Rimasauska even went so far as to fabricate emails which appeared to be from corporate executives to back up his claim to money.

Facebook gave him $99 million and Google gave him $23 million.

He pretended to be the Taiwanese hardware manufacture Quanta Computer Inc, and in Latvia he registered a company with the same name.

His requests included stamps with the company’s name. No one bothered to check if the invoices were legitimate, and they sent him the money. By using the forged emails and the fact that the two companies had the same name, he was able to trick the companies out of more than a hundred million dollars. He managed to trick the companies as well as the banks to work with him to wire the funds.

Rimasauska agreed to forfeit $50 million. No one knows what happened to the remaining $73 million, and it’s suspected that he stashed them in yprus, Lithuania, Hungary, Slovakia, and Latvia. yprus, Lithuania, Hungary, Slovakia, and Latvia. He opened multiple bank accounts to receive the funds.

The indictment did not identify Google and Facebook, but a Lithuanian court order in 2017 identified them as the victims.

According to Google, “”We detected this fraud and promptly alerted the authorities. We recouped the funds and we’re pleased this matter is resolved.”

This type of fraud is known as business email compromise, which is when fraudsters attempt to compromise companies who buy from foreign companies.
Man Stole $122 Million from Facebook and Google By Simply Asking Them for Money

Rimasauska faces up to 30 years behind bars and his sentencing is currently scheduled for July 24. According to Manhattan U.S. Attorney Geoffrey S. Berman , “As Evaldas Rimasauskas admitted today, he devised a blatant scheme to fleece U.S. companies out of over $100 million, and then siphoned those funds to bank accounts around the globe….caused forged invoices, contracts, and letters that falsely appeared to have been executed and signed by executives and agents of the Victim Companies, and which bore false corporate stamps embossed with the Victim Companies’ names, to be submitted to banks in support of the large volume of funds that were fraudulently transmitted via wire transfer.“

Companies are urged to be on the lookout for phishing attempts such as this one. Paul Petrus, a lawyer for Rimasauska, said that the plea spoke for itself and he declined to comment.